The protestant ethic and spirit of

Confucianism and TaoismThe Religion of India: To illustrate his theory, Weber quotes the ethical writings of Benjamin Franklin: Remember, that time is money. He that can earn ten shillings a day by his labor, and goes abroad, or sits idle, one half of that day, though he spends but sixpence during his diversion or idleness, ought not to reckon that the only expense; he has really spent, or rather thrown away, five shillings besides.

The protestant ethic and spirit of

Table of Contents Summary Max Weber's The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism is a study of the relationship between the ethics of ascetic Protestantism and the emergence of the spirit of modern capitalism.

Weber argues that the religious ideas of groups such as the Calvinists played a role in creating the capitalistic spirit.

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Weber first observes a correlation between being Protestant and being involved in business, and declares his intent to explore religion as a potential cause of the modern economic conditions.

He argues that the modern spirit of capitalism sees profit as an end in itself, and pursuing profit as virtuous. Weber's goal is to understand the source of this spirit. He turns to Protestantism for a potential explanation. Protestantism offers a concept of the worldly "calling," and gives worldly activity a religious character.

The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism - Max Weber, Talcott Parsons - Google Books

While important, this alone cannot explain the need to pursue profit. One branch of Protestantism, Calvinism, does provide this explanation. Calvinists believe in predestination--that God has already determined who is saved and damned. As Calvinism developed, a deep psychological need for clues about whether one was actually saved arose, and Calvinists looked to their success in worldly activity for those clues.

Thus, they came to value profit and material success as signs of God's favor. Other religious groups, such as the Pietists, Methodists, and the Baptist sects had similar attitudes to a lesser degree. Weber argues that this new attitude broke down the traditional economic system, paving the way for modern capitalism.

However, once capitalism emerged, the Protestant values were no longer necessary, and their ethic took on a life of its own.

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We are now locked into the spirit of capitalism because it is so useful for modern economic activity. Throughout his book, Weber emphasizes that his account is incomplete. He is not arguing that Protestantism caused the capitalistic spirit, but rather that it was one contributing factor.

He also acknowledges that capitalism itself had an impact on the development of the religious ideas. The full story is much more complex than Weber's partial account, and Weber himself constantly reminds his readers about his own limitations.

The book itself has an introduction and five chapters. The first three chapters make up what Weber calls "The Problem.The percentage of Protestant students studying and graduating for technical and industrial jobs was far more than Catholics.

The protestant ethic and spirit of

Catholics had more interest in crafts, thus they become craftsmen, on the other hand, protestants become upper rank skilled factory labour. Protestant ethic | sociology | alphabetnyc.com "The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism" is a book written by sociologist and economist Max Weber in The original version was in German and it was translated into English in It is often considered a founding text in economic sociology and sociology in general.

"The. From a general summary to chapter summaries to explanations of famous quotes, the SparkNotes The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism Study Guide has .

The Protestant ethic — a moral code stressing hard work, rigorous self-discipline, and the organization of one's life in the service of God — was made famous by sociologist and political economist Max Weber/5(6). The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism (German: Die protestantische Ethik und der Geist des Kapitalismus) is a book written by Max Weber, a German sociologist, economist, and politician.

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